TBR Thursday #7

Dust off your shelves

 

TBR Thursday is a weekly post hosted by yours truly.  If you’d like to participate in TBR Thursdays, please feel free!  Link me in your post so I can talk a look at what you’ve got on your shelves and so we can cry together about how we are never going to actually finish reading through our TBR piles.

TBR Thursday is going to become more and more important for me as the need to save some money grows! Scottish Fiance and I are in the midst of some Exciting Life Things, so I’m reigning in the book-buying extravaganzas. I’m hoping to continue this semi-failing project of only reading what I’ve got in the flat.

 

Rules:

  • Pick four books from your shelf or you Kindle that you haven’t read yet (the longer they’ve gathering dust the better!)
  • Post a short description of the books
  • Post a few short sentences on when you bought it, why you want to read it, etc.

 

 

 

Fantasy

The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

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They say that the Thorn of Camorr can beat anyone in a fight. They say he steals from the rich and gives to the poor. They say he’s part man, part myth, and mostly street-corner rumor. And they are wrong on every count.

Only averagely tall, slender, and god-awful with a sword, Locke Lamora is the fabled Thorn, and the greatest weapons at his disposal are his wit and cunning. He steals from the rich – they’re the only ones worth stealing from – but the poor can go steal for themselves. What Locke cons, wheedles and tricks into his possession is strictly for him and his band of fellow con-artists and thieves: the Gentleman Bastards.

I’ve just bumped this up a level in my TBR hierarchy:  it went from hiding behind the double-stacked books on my shelf to a spot on my nightstand.  My friend has been nudging me to read this for ages and I’m finally going to do it!  I love a good fantasy heist novel and I know this is among the best.

 

 

Science Fiction

Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky

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The last remnants of the human race left a dying Earth, desperate to find a new home among the stars. Following in the footsteps of their ancestors, they discover the greatest treasure of the past age – a world terraformed and prepared for human life.

But all is not right in this new Eden. In the long years since the planet was abandoned, the work of its architects has borne disastrous fruit. The planet is not waiting for them, pristine and unoccupied. New masters have turned it from a refuge into mankind’s worst nightmare.

There are few things I love more than a solid space faring novel.  I know Tchaikovsky best for his fantasy books (which I haven’t read yet), and would really love to give this sci-fi book a shot.  It is apparently spectacular and won the Arthur C. Clarke Award in 2016.  Also it apparently has evil, alien spiders.

 

 

Crime

The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith

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When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days—as he has done before—and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home.

But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine’s disappearance than his wife realizes. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were to be published, it would ruin lives—meaning that there are a lot of people who might want him silenced.

When Quine is found brutally murdered under bizarre circumstances, it becomes a race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any Strike has encountered before…

I really enjoyed the first Cormoran Strike novel (despite picturing him in my head as Jeremy Clarkson) and need to carry on with the series.  This one particularly interests me because it’s apparently all about crazy publishers!  Yes please.

 

 

History

The Private Lives of the Tudors by Tracy Borman

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The Tudor monarchs were constantly surrounded by an army of attendants, courtiers and ministers. Even in their most private moments, they were accompanied by a servant specifically appointed for the task. A groom of the stool would stand patiently by as Henry VIII performed his daily purges, and when Elizabeth I retired for the evening, one of her female servants would sleep at the end of her bed. 

These attendants knew the truth behind the glamorous exterior. They saw the tears shed by Henry VII upon the death of his son Arthur. They knew the tragic secret behind ‘Bloody’ Mary’s phantom pregnancies. And they saw the ‘crooked carcass’ beneath Elizabeth I’s carefully applied makeup, gowns and accessories. 

It is the accounts of these eyewitnesses, as well as a rich array of other contemporary sources that historian Tracy Borman has examined more closely than ever before. With new insights and discoveries, and in the same way that she brilliantly illuminated the real Thomas Cromwell – The Private Life of the Tudors will reveal previously unexamined details about the characters we think we know so well.

In terms of history, I’m actually far less interested in the Tudors than many of my fellow amateur historians.  This book looks fascinating though, I love the idea of getting a peak behind the scenes of the fabulous Tudor dynasty!

 

That’s it for this week!  What’s gathering dust on your shelves?  Have you read any of these books?  Let me know!

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